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For any questions not addressed below, contact Building Safety at 352-438-2400 during our regular business hours of 8 a.m.-4 p.m. on Monday-Thursday and 9 a.m.-4 p.m. on Friday.

Select your question below to jump to that answer.

  1. When is a building permit necessary?
  2. Do I need a permit for a swimming pool?
  3. How long will it take to get a building permit?
  4. Which building permits require plan review?
  5. What do I need to have on the jobsite at the time of inspection?
  6. I'm a state-certified contractor. What information will I need to provide when I register as a contractor in Marion County?
  7. I'm licensed as a registered contractor in another county in Florida. What information will I need to provide when I register as a contractor in Marion County?
  8. What do I need to do to obtain a local competency card in Marion County?
  9. I'm a property owner. Can I apply for a building permit, if I am not a licensed contractor?
  10. What is the role of the Marion County License Review Board?
  11. What are the duties and responsibilities of the Building Safety Director/Marion County Building Official?
  12. Who can interpret provisions of the Florida Building Code?
  13. Who can interpret provisions of the Florida Fire Code?

1. Q.  When is a building permit necessary? 

A.   Note: “It is the responsibility of the home owner or contractor to have a building permit issued, in hand and posted, prior to work start.”   

Per Florida Building Code (FBC), 5th Edition (2014) and Florida Residential Code (FRC) 5th Edition (2014) and all referenced codes.  

FBC Part 1 - Section 101 General

101.2 SCOPE. The provision of this code shall apply to the construction, alteration relocation, enlargement, replacement, repair, equipment, use and occupancy, location, maintenance, removal and demolition of every building or structure or any appurtenances connected or attached to such buildings or structures.

 FBC Part 1 - Section 105 Permits

105.1 REQUIRED. Any owner or authorized agent who intends to construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, demolish, or change the occupancy of a building or structure, or to erect, install, enlarge, alter, repair, remove, convert, or replace any impact-resistant coverings, electrical, gas, mechanical or plumbing system, the installation of which is regulated by this code, or to cause any such work to be done, shall first make application to the building official and obtain the required permit

 Please reference the following for additional pertinent information:
 - FBC 102.2 Building exemptions.
 - FBC 105.2 Work exempt from permit.
 - FBC 105.2.1 Emergency repairs.
 - FBC 105.2.2 Minor repairs.
 - FBC 105.4.1 Permit intent.

When in doubt whether a permit is needed you can call our office at 352-438-2400 or refer to the  Florida Building Code Chapter 1.

2. Q.  Do I need a permit for a swimming pool? 

A. All swimming pools, above and in-ground, larger or equal to 24 inches in depth require a permit. Also, the child barrier and electric set up must meet Florida Building code standards.

3. Q.  How long will it take to get a building permit? 

A. Applications may be submitted by email, fax, or dropped off at our office. Permit applications will be processed in the order received. Processing time will depend on the level of permit activity and availability of staff trained to process permits. Those applications that require review by other departments may take several days to process. A service representative can provide you with an 'estimated' processing time for your permit application.

4. Q.  Which building permits require plan review? 

A. Fire alarm systems.
     Fire suppression systems.
     Mobile home installations and additions.
     New commercial additions or alterations.
     New commercial structures.
     New residential additions or alterations.
     New residential structures.
     Signs.
     Swimming pools. 

5. Q.   What do I need to have on the jobsite at the time of inspection? 

A. Access to permitted construction work.
     Animals restrained. 
     Plans stamped by Building Safety.
     Permit Inspection Record.
     Work completed for inspection scheduled.

6.  Q.  I'm a state-certified contractor. What information will I need to provide when I register as a contractor in Marion County?

A. To register as a state-certified contractor in Marion County the applicant must provide:
     1.  State license.
     2.  Proof of workers compensation and liability insurance.
     3.  Drivers License or Government issued ID.
     4.  Complete Marion County Licensing Application.

7. Q. I'm licensed as a registered contractor in another county in Florida. What information will I need to provide when I register as a contractor in Marion County?      

A. To apply for registration as a registered contractor in Marion County the applicant must provide the following: Submit application for reciprocity - the applicant will then be scheduled to appear before the Marion County License Review Board (LRB).
     1. Letter of Reciprocity from county where testing took place.
     2. State license
     3.  Notarized letter of recommendation from a licensed contractor.

     4. Proof of workers compensation and liability insurance. 

8. Q.  What do I need to do to obtain a local competency card in Marion County 

A. An application can be made with the Marion County Building Department as a contractor desiring to do business in Marion County. Each applicant must demonstrate competency by providing either a letter of reciprocity from another Florida county or by taking exam.

The following steps are needed to obtain a local competency card:
1. Complete an application for sponsorship/exam.
2. Provide documentation of four years of experience in the specific trade, with proof showing       at least one of those years as working in a supervisory capacity.
3. Notarized letter of recommendation from a licensed contractor.
4. Once you have collected all of the above materials, submit this information to Building Safety's Licensing Division.   

Additionally, each contractor must provide evidence of worker's compensation and liability insurance, and proof of fictitious name filing, if applicable.

9. Q.  I'm a property owner. Can I apply for a building permit, if I am not a licensed contractor?  

A. Yes. "Owners of property when acting as their own contractor and providing direct, onsite supervision themselves of all work not performed by licensed contractors, when building or improving farm outbuildings or one-or-two family residences on such property for the occupancy or use of such owners and not offered for sale or lease, or building or improving commercial buildings, at a cost not to exceed $75,000.00, on such property for the occupancy or use of such owners and not for sale or lease." Florida Statutes ss:489.103.  

10. Q. What is the role of the Marion County License Review Board? 

A. The Marion County License Review Board is responsible for hearing cases related to:
     1. Applications for licensure.
     2. Appeals of decisions of the Building Official.
     3. Appeals of unsafe building determination by the Building Official.
     4. Violations of contracting rules in county ordinances and state statutes.   

11. Q.  What are the duties and responsibilities of Building Safety Director/Marion County Building Official? 

A. The Building Director/Building Official is responsible for:
    1. Adopting policies and procedures to clarify the application of provisions of the Florida Building Code.
     2. All operations of Building Safety.
     3. Enforcing the Florida Building Code.
     4. Identifying and abating unsafe buildings or systems.
     5. Rendering interpretations of the Florida Building Code.

12. Q. Who can interpret provisions of the Florida Building Code? 

A. Both the Marion County Building Official and the Florida Building Commission can render interpretations of the Florida Building Code.  

13. Q. Who can interpret provisions of the Florida Fire Code? 

A. Both the Marion County Fire Marshal and the State Fire Marshal can render interpretations of the Florida Fire Code.